Deciding to Relocate – Some Tips With the Tough Decisions

When making the decision to relocate, there are many complicated factors to consider. You may be leaving friends, family, and a job you love behind. You could be moving from a big city to the suburbs, or countryside and encounter a new world you’re vastly unfamiliar with. Maybe you’re married, and this seems like a great move for your spouse, but you’re wondering what’s the benefit for you, besides accompanying your spouse?

As you struggle with the decision of whether to move, or, perhaps it’s why to move, I’d like to offer a great resource I’ve found when it comes to making big decisions. Debbie Ford, a Life Coach, wrote a great book called,”The Right Questions”. It offers some excellent strategies that can help with these decisions. (Note: I do not know Debbie or get any proceeds from her book! This is just an honest review of a book I’ve found excellent in trying times, and one that I’d like to recommend to you!) And, generally speaking, this is an excellent book if you’re not good at making decisions, or are confronted with a very difficult one and need some help.

In a nutshell, Ms. Ford suggests approaching difficult decisions with a core set of questions. I’ve summarized the ones I feel are most relevant to a relocation, but her book suggests a few others you might also find of use. I’ll distinguish between the “Expat” and “Trailing Spouse” where necessary.

1. Will this help me reach the future I am wishing for, or does it leave me stuck in the past? In other words – if you have a goal for yourself, or your family, will this move help bring you towards that goal, or, can you work together to create a new, joint goal for your family? This one is great to ask together, as a family, and also individually. Ms. Ford makes the point that decisions based on fear keep you rooted in the past, whereas those that you make to support your dreams give you a sense of empowerment.

2. Will this decision bring you long term fulfillment, or short-term gratification? Expat – does this move create a long-term, enriching experience for you (and your family) or is it something you’ll tire of after a few months? Trailing Spouse – consider the scenarios of going, and staying. Even if you have a great job that you’re giving up, is that job giving you enough satisfaction and money that you want to stay – or could there be new opportunity for you someplace else, if you were willing to try?

3. Am I doing what’s best for me, or trying to please someone else? Expat – do you really want or need this move (in a rough economy, the financial aspects may, of course, be the deciding factor) or are you doing this to please your boss or someone else? Trailing Spouse – are you saying “yes” to please your spouse, or “no” to please your friends and family? You may have a tougher time figuring out your own thoughts on this one, if you find yourself pulled in different directions by different family members. If that’s the case, take some time alone to devote to figuring out what is best for YOU in spite of what’s best for anyone else. Of course, you want to consider your goals, as well as those of your spouse/children in the process, but hearing your own voice amid all the others is key.

4. Am I seeing what’s right, or trying to figure out what’s wrong? Expat – when you get the opportunity, if you considered all the downsides, have you also considered the positive aspects of this move? For example, maybe there’s better education opportunities for your kids, or if you don’t know whether you can return to your present job after the Expat experience, maybe there’s opportunity for a new career path. Trailing Spouse – are you thinking only of everything you have to give up in this move, or have you considered the opportunities that could open up, and where those might take you?

5. Does this choice excite me, or deplete me of energy? This is a great piece to tune into – if you’ve made the decision to go, and feel excited, even though you have some fears and doubts, then you know you’re headed in the right direction. If however, the decision to stay/leave causes you to end up feeling drained, exhausted, and frustrated, it may be an indicator that something deeper than your conscious thoughts is calling for your attention.

6. Will this help me grow as a person, or will I use it as a way to beat myself up? This question is especially relevant if you decided to relocate and you end up disappointed. As the Expat, perhaps you end up disappointed with the work experience. As the trailing spouse, perhaps you don’t find the opportunities you thought you would. So, you have the choice, at that point, to beat yourself up, blame yourself for making a lousy decision, and either turn back, or be miserable. OR, you can accept that the experience didn’t turn out how you expected, and it’s not your fault. Then, you can decide whether to give up, or, truly take a look at the experience and decide if there’s something you can do to make it more joyful. Knowing that you hold the keys to your own empowerment allows you create the outcome you want, and that will make you truly happy.

7. Is this an act of faith, or an act of fear? This is so important, and really the core message of your decision. The choice to stay, or remain, will no doubt bring up fears, as change often does. It may bring up excitement, too. However, at the end of the day, if you choose to take, or turn down, this relocation opportunity out of fear, you will end up dis-empowered, and perhaps sabotage the experience. If, however, you act from faith, knowing and accepting that there may be hard times, you will open doors for yourself, and know that, even in the low moments, you’ll find a way forward.

Of course, there’s many points to consider beyond this such as education, health care, bureaucracy, cost of living, etc. But I offer you these excellent thinking points from which to start your decision process. I think the main benefit of asking these questions is that you get to realize this is a conscious decision, made by you. This in turn empowers you to take responsibility to make the experience the best it can be, even in the rough spots.

If you found these tips helpful, you might want to take a look at “The Right Questions” to learn more about this questioning process. You may also enjoy the tips and strategies about relocating successfully, offered in my How To Feel at Home Anywhere in the World report, and mp3 affirmation file available at culturetransition.com.

Moving Tips – Preparing For Your Furniture Removal When Moving House

Moving house is complicated enough, without making things worse by being unprepared and disorganized. Whether it is a simple local furniture removal or a more complicated interstate furniture removal or interstate backloading, there are lots of easy things you can do to maker the whole process go smoothly.

Prior to Packing

This step is usually overlooked by many people. It is essential to have an area where you can launch your packing progress without interruption and definitely without interfering with the regular routines within your household. Another thing to consider is if you have children, elderly or disabled people in your home, this area has to be either secure enough so that entry can be obstructed or safe so that no objects can fall on a person, cannot be tripped over, or dangerous objects and items items cannot be interfered with.

Above all safety has to be the main priority, then security and convenience. Then follow the moving tips for preparation below:

Gather all needed materials

Choose a big work type area to deal with cartons of all sizes

Create a protected work surface, preferably an old table that is strong, covered with a plastic sheet or an old bed sheet

Use a large and old tin can to store scissors, packing tape, packing string and markers in

Use one corner near the table for neat stacks of packing paper, old newspaper and bags of Styrofoam nuggets/bubble wrap

Final Moving Tips Preparation List

Your workspace and materials are in place, but you are not quite ready yet. Use the following as your method or plan in preparing for your move:

Pack one room and then move onto another

Pack the least used rooms first

Leave bathrooms and bedrooms until last

Preferable pack rooms from the top of your home to the bottom – this makes it easier when moving your things into your new home

Start packing 3 months ahead if possible

Divide belongings into four sections in each room – to be moved by movers, to be moved by you, to be donated and to throw out

In the workspace, separate packed things to be moved by you from the ones for the movers

Dispose of all garbage each day

Take donated items to charity shops or hold a yard sale every weekend to sell worthwhile things

Pack a few or more boxes daily

Mark every box according to its room/box #

List each packed box room/box # on an inventory sheet with a brief description of the contents and if it is for the movers or you to handle

Make a secondary copy of your inventory list for the movers

Have a commentary or notes section on the inventory list for details about box conditions, if fragile or special instructions

Double check your have sufficient packing materials – do not throw out or recycle newspapers, but keep them back for packing even if you have too much

Check all boxes are properly secured with packing tape, especially that the bottoms can take the contents’ weight without breaking

Allow a maximum weight of only 50lbs/box

Pack heavy items at the bottom

Pack lighter items at the top

Small boxes = heavy contents

Large boxes = light contents

6 Tips From Professionals TO Make Your House Moving Experience Hassle Free

Getting a new house is always a joyful experience but the troublesome part is the packing. When you are relocating, you need to pack everything in the house and this is a big task. Here are some tips to get you going smoothly and stay organised all the time during this period.

First of all, you need a few items to help you pack easily. These items are plenty of boxes, couple of rolls of masking tape, a marker to label the boxes and a detailed packing list.

Before you start this endeavour, you need to make a list of all the rooms in your house and give yourself separate deadlines to check and pack the things in those rooms. For example, dining room – 31st Jan.

Now we are ready to get going.

1. Pack the least used items or places of the house first.

For example, the entertainment room of the house is something which can be lived without, for a few days. Compare it against bathroom or dining room which are used multiple times daily and they are a must. You should also pack the decorative items (say, a painting) before you pack the more frequently needed items like your kitchen utensils or toiletries. You can pack your fancy clothes as well, leaving the daily wear for the last date.

2. Pack by Categories

Prepare boxes to pack similar items and keep all the boxes containing similar items together. For example, you can have categories like books, footwear, kitchenware, clothing and so on. You can create your own category because only you know what you have in your house.

You can actually divide categories into subcategories, if you want. For example, among your kitchenware, you can create different boxes for fragile items and put them together. This will help you to unpack more methodically after your house moving is over and you are settle in your new house.

3. Label everything

Use a dark marker pen and label every box, using big bold letters. The bigger letters will be easy to notice when handling the boxes You should mark the fragile or costly items somewhat differently so these boxes are not confused with the regular boxes. During, house moving, you can use a different colour masking tape to mark these special boxes. Finally, write your name and contact number on every box.

4. Everybody Get Involved

If everyone in the house packs his or her own items, not only it will be done faster but it will also be more methodical and fruitful endeavour. People can pack their own rooms before common rooms are packed.

5. Sell/Discard unwanted items

Over time, we tend to gather things we don’t require or we don’t want to use anymore. Getting rid of these items will not only help you to pack less, you will actually save on the moving expenses. Less sweat and less weight for you to handle, if you do this.

6. Get Professional Help

One of the easiest ways would be to employ a professional movers and packers who have the experience of handling such matters regularly. They will bring their professional expertise and all the equipments and items needed to make this a smooth and hassle-free process for you.

6 Useful Tips to Consider When Hiring the Professional Removalists

The professional removalists are essential to make a future move a truly worry-free experience. They will provide a high-quality service that will ensure your belongings are transported safety and without damage. However, it is important to conduct a little research before signing a contract.

Let’s take a look at a few of the most important things to consider:

Referrals

Many first-timer home owners ask family and friends for a personal referral. Simply asking friends, co-workers, or even your estate agent can help to short-list the most promising candidates. Additionally, it can benefit to call the companies and ask for references or use one of the many sites that published customer reviews of local services.

Estimates

Ask for an in-person estimate to get an accurate idea of cost. A variety of factors are taken into account when quoting the cost, such as the distance to travel, type and weight of items, and packing services. Try to get at least two or three estimates in advance to give more time to compare the options side-by-side.

Belongings

Make sure to be very clear to the removalists about the belongings, clothes, furniture and boxes that need to be transported. They will only need to move the items that were mentioned at the time of giving the estimate. If extra items are added at a later point, this is likely to result in a further charge on top of the original estimate. Also, this can cause real complications if the moving truck doesn’t have the space to accept the extra items.

Added fees

The cost quoted for the move should be all-inclusive and not subject to any added fees, such as equipment fees, extra stops charges or fuel surcharges.

Packing service

Many of the removalists are likely to offer a packing service which means they will take on the responsibility of safely packing your goods for the journey to your new home. A crating or packing service is certain to eliminate a lot of the stress you are likely to feel as the moving date starts to arrive.

Alternatively, if you prefer to take on the packing work, you can buy or hire enough boxes from the removalists to get your belongings ready.

Insurance coverage

Ideally the removalists should include a certain amount of insurance coverage in the package to make sure your belongings are covered in the event of an accident. Plus, it will help to get details of the insurance coverage confirmed in writing. However, it may be worth checking with your home insurance to see if this type of coverage is already included.

Furniture Removalists – Tips on Moving to a New Office

Furniture removalists will take care of moving your equipment and other items to your new office. But what should you do before the movers come in to pick up your things? Here are some tips on how to prepare for an office move.

You should make yourself familiar with at least the size and location of your new office space. Usually, companies brief all employees about details of their transfer. This will help you decide if plants, wall decors and other accessories should be sent to the new office or not. However, if you do not know any information yet, ask your boss or whoever is in charge of the transfer. You should also ask if there are any restrictions or guidelines set before starting to do anything with your equipment or belongings. For instance, if your company has arranged with furniture removalists that filing cabinets and similar items should be the first to go, you need to prepare them first.

Make sure you empty all shelves, desks, bookcases and similar storage furniture, except filing cabinets, which only need to be locked before moving. All contents from your desks and shelves should be packed neatly in boxes. Label your boxes with your name, box content details, numbers (to know which should be opened first when unpacking), new location, and any other special instructions. If there are items that you need to leave in your old office or to discard, tag or label them accordingly, too. This will save you time and effort in giving instructions to movers. This is also the time to sort out your clutter – recycle what can be recycled and shred what needs to be shredded.

Companies normally ask their IT personnel to take care of all computers when moving offices. You should make sure, though, that you back up all your files before your PC is packed. Burning all your files into a DVD or copying them to a flash drive is your easiest and most convenient option. If you wish to send it with the furniture removalists, you can keep them in a box that contains all your other software disks and instruction manuals for your other electronic equipment that will be transferred to the new office. However, it would be best if you just bring it with you personally.

It is recommended that you also bring privately all your personal documents and other such valuable items, so you would not risk them getting lost in the moving process. Usually, companies will have it in their guidelines that employees are suggested to not include personal belongings with the professional movers, mainly due to risk of loss and insurance problems.